By Courtney Donovan Smith Taishang Factories Disrupted by COVID-19 Taiwanese manufacturers in China, particularly those based in Shanghai and neighboring Kunshan, have suffered plant closures and supply chain issues due to China’s “dynamic zero-COVID” policies and the extended lockdown of the Shanghai region, widespread disruptions to trucking within China, and delays at the port of…

By Courtney Donovan Smith April Marks End to Zero-COVID Policy Locally transmitted cases in Taiwan have been rising exponentially since early April, as the Omicron variant began spreading across the island. Recognizing the variant’s infectiousness, the economic costs of the zero-COVID approach, and that almost all reported cases have been mild or asymptomatic, the government…

By Courtney Donovan Smith Experts Split On Economic Forecast Uncertainty about inflation and supply chain resilience have led various organizations to reach different projections about the economy’s direction this year. The Chung-Hua Institution for Economic Research (CIER) in April raised its forecast of Taiwan’s 2022 GDP growth by 0.29 percentage points to 3.96%. CIER attributed…

As global brands increasingly incorporate environmental, social, and governance (ESG) criteria into their business strategies, many are also looking to ensure that their supply chain partners also follow sustainable practices.  Small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) with competitive ratings could use this advantage to gain an entry ticket into global supply chains, says Michelle Sun, general…

The crisis in Ukraine has sparked discussions among policymakers in Taiwan on how to enhance the island’s defense capabilities, including through a recently intensified reservist training program and proposals to lengthen the conscription period. A key takeaway for many is that training, motivation, leadership, mobility, and flexibility are just as much key factors in defending…

March Blackouts Raise Supply, Grid Concerns Taiwan experienced widespread blackouts on March 3, affecting over 5 million households around the island. Both human error and mechanical failures were at fault, according to Taiwan’s state-owned electricity monopoly Taipower. Although power was restored by the end of the day, the incident caused significant disruption to households and…