Government measures to cool the residential property market have been successful, but prices remain high in the most desirable markets, putting homeownership out of reach for many Taiwanese. The Taiwan government has spent years trying to cool a red-hot residential property market. Measured in terms of controlling price growth, the policies have borne fruit. The…

Several major global economic and political factors – namely, the U.S.-China trade dispute, Brexit, the protests in Hong Kong, as well as volatile oil and commodity prices – cast a shadow in the past year over global demand, trade, and industrial production. In Taiwan, the presidential election and cross-Strait relationship added uncertainty, potentially dampening the…

In August, Taiwan’s Directorate General of Budget, Accounting & Statistics revised its GDP growth forecast for 2018 upward to 2.69% due mainly to increasing private investment. Government investment is also expected to increase this year by 5.06%, with the authorities aiming to spend NT$420 billion (about US$13.8 billion) on infrastructure over the next four years…

As confidence returns to real estate, Taiwan must take steps to ensure its real estate market champions transparency and security and remains a thriving destination for global investment. In the recently published 2017 Taiwan White Paper, the Real Estate Committee of the American Chamber of Commerce in Taipei commends the Taiwan government for recent efforts…

Source: CBRE Research, Real Capital Analytics

Faced with a tepid home property market, Taiwan’s life insurers are increasingly investing in high-yield overseas property. Taiwan’s cash-rich life insurers have scant investment opportunities at home, as yield levels have flagged in recent years amidst an overheated property market and weak rental growth. Insurers are constrained by minimum yield requirements set by the Financial…

Taipei 101, the tallest and largest green building of LEED Platinum certification in the world since 2011. Photo: Romain Pontida

More can be done, say experts, particularly through government incentives, education, and retrofitting old buildings.    Green buildings would seem to be perfect for hot climates. They’re cool (literally) and energy-efficient. They save money and may even contribute to saving the planet. Why then aren’t more of Taiwan’s commercial and domestic buildings green? According to…

View from Taipei 101 summer 2010 shows several major construction projects underway Photo: Lord Koxinga

Tourism from China buoyed Taiwan’s hotel sector during former President Ma Ying-jeou’s eight years in office, spurring hoteliers to refurbish aging properties and add thousands of new rooms to the market. Resilient demand helped hotels post enviable earnings. That golden era ended swiftly with the inauguration of President Tsai Ing-wen in May. Irked by Tsai’s…