Many of Taiwan’s major medical centers now house private clinics that offer premium services to patients with the means to pay out-of-pocket and provide the hospitals with an additional source of revenue. A quick glance at the waiting room at the Taiwan Adventist Hospital’s International Priority Care Center (PCC) reveals that this is no ordinary…

— By Jane Rickards and Don Shapiro  Ming and Qing Dynasty soldiers described Taiwan as a place where “disease is rampant.” Yet before large numbers of Han people began arriving in the mid-17th century, the island’s indigenous peoples had managed to live generally healthy lives. Japanese researchers later documented how the Austronesian peoples used local medicinal plants to cure various…

Aside from the large medical centers that enjoy significant economies of scale, many Taiwanese hospitals have been faced with financial difficulties due to rising costs. Many smaller hospitals have closed or merged, and the survivors have been looking for ways to cut expenses and increase revenues. The proportion of healthcare expenditures paid by patients out of…

Amid the disruption caused by COVID-19, Taiwan’s hospitals have turned to online tools to maintain valuable partnerships with Southeast Asian countries forged under the New Southbound Policy. As one of the flagship programs of the Taiwan government’s New Southbound Policy (NSP), the One Country, One Center (1C1C) project enables Taiwan to share its vaunted healthcare…

Yuanlin Christian Hospital, a pioneering smart hospital, located in heavily rural Changhua County focuses on emergency and critical care in a part of Taiwan where emergency resources are scarce. The hospital opened in 2015, and with nearly 500 beds, 70 attending doctors, and more than 500 nurses, it can treat major traumas. It also offers emergency and inpatient treatment for children and various gynecological services.