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As the political capital and commercial center, Taipei in northern Taiwan is well-known throughout Asia. Many frequent visitors are familiar with Kaohsiung, the major port and industrial powerhouse in the south. Taichung, roughly equidistant between the two, has long been seen as Taiwan’s “third city.” Population statistics suggest a different pecking order, however. The municipality…

Greater Taipei, home to almost a third of Taiwan’s 23.5 million residents, is a wonderfully diverse yet conveniently compact region. In addition to manmade attractions like Taipei 101, the National Palace Museum, and a fabulous array of restaurants, the cities of Taipei, New Taipei, and Keelung boast mountains almost 7,000-feet high (2,133 meters), engrossing coastal…

Over the past quarter century, Taiwan has become a far freer and much more tolerant society. The authorities no longer promote a single culture, that of the Han Chinese people. Instead, the Austronesian culture of Taiwan’s indigenous people and Japanese influences from past colonial rule that have helped make modern Taiwan the diverse and fascinating…

After World War II, Taiwan’s western lowlands saw rapid economic and social development, boosted by Taiwan’s strategically central location within East Asia – with Japan to the northeast and the Philippines to the south. Cities like Taipei and Kaohsiung multiplied in size, and factories producing “Made in Taiwan” goods proliferated. Families that had farmed for…